Monday, 17 November 2014

NetSurf Developer workshop IV

Michael Drake, John-Mark Bell, Daniel Silverstone, Rob Kendrick and Vincent Sanders at the Codethink manchester office
Over the weekend the NetSurf developers met to make a concentrated effort on improving the browser. This time we were kindly hosted by Codethink in their Manchester office in a pleasant environment with plenty of refreshments.

Five developers managed to attend in person from around the UK: Michael Drake, John-Mark Bell, Daniel Silverstone, Rob Kendrick and Vincent Sanders. We also had Chris Young providing some bug fixes remotely.

We started the weekend by discussing all the thorny core issues that had been put on the agenda and ensuring the outcomes were properly noted. We also held the society AGM which was minuted by Daniel.

The emphasis of this weekend was very much on planning and doing the disruptive changes we had been putting off until we were all together.

John-Mark and myself managed to change the core build system as used by all the libraries to using standard triplets to identify systems and use the gnu autoconf style of naming for parameters (i.e. HOST, BUILD and CC being used correctly).

This was accompanied by improvements and configuration changes to the CI system to accommodate the new usage.

Several issues from the bug tracker were addressed and we put ourselves in a stronger position to address numerous other usability problems in the future.

We managed to pack a great deal into the 20 hours of work on Saturday and Sunday although because we were concentrating much more on planning and infrastructure rather than a release the metrics of commits and files changed were lower than at previous events.

Thursday, 13 November 2014

The care of open source creatures

A mini Debian conference happened at the weekend in Cambridge at which I was asked to present. Rather than go with an old talk I decided to try something new. I attempted to cover the topic of application life cycle for open source projects.

The presentation abstract tried to explain this:
A software project that is developed by more than a single person starts requiring more than just the source code. From revision control systems through to continuous integration and issue tracking, all these services need deploying and maintaining.

This presentation takes a look at what a services a project ought to have, what options exist to fulfil those requirements and a practical look at an open source projects actual implementation.
I presented on Sunday morning but got a good audience and I am told I was not completely dreadful. The talk was recorded and is publicly available along with all the rest of the conference presentations.

Unfortunately due to other issues in my life right now I did not prepare well enough in advance and my slide deck was only completed on Saturday so I was rather less familiar with the material than I would have preferred.

The rest of the conference was excellent and I managed to see many of the presentations on a good variety of topics without an overwhelming attention to Debian issues. My youngest son brought himself along on both days and "helped" with front desk. He was also the only walk out in my presentation, he insists it was just because he "did not understand a single thing I was saying" but perhaps he just knew who the designated driver was.

I would like thank everyone who organised and sponsored this event for an enjoyable weekend and look forward to the next one.

Wednesday, 1 October 2014

It is a bad plan that admits of no modification

I find it somewhat interesting that thousands of years later that our society still uses Publilius Syrus sententiae though I imagine the tendency to leave well enough alone means such phrases stay in usage.

Marvell ARM system - Photo from Steve McIntyre
One weekend Steve McIntyre asked me if I could find a source of some of some 40mm fans for some systems with some pretty strict requirements. They needed to be long life and shift a lot of air to combat a persistent overheating issue.

I sat with him and went through the Farnell utterly hateful parametric web interface and eventually came up with a couple of options which were very expensive. Only then did I stop and ask what the actual problem was.

Marvell ARM system Original internal cooling arrangement - Photo from Steve McIntyre
Steve showed me one of the Debian ARM buildd boxes which are Marvell development machines. These systems are powerful quad core machines housed in compact steel enclosures.

There is a single 40mm fan trying to provide cooling for the entire enclosure. When the units are placed horizontally and used intermittently this proves adequate. Unfortunately when the system are arranged vertically in a rack and run at full load continuously they often overheat and have to be restarted. In addition the small high speed fans need replacing frequently as their bearings wore out quickly.

Debian ARM buildd systems - Photo from Steve McIntyreThis was obviously causing some issues for the ARM Debian ports which Steve wanted to rectify. After talking the problem through for a while we came to the conclusion we could use much larger 60mm fans to blow air directly through the top of the case onto the cpu heatsink.

Larger fans can be run much more slowly to move a similar volume of air to the smaller 40mm fans which gives a much longer service life.

Hole punch and Drilling template
Steve proceeded to order enough parts to allow us to modify all the Debian systems, this worked out cheaper than a single "special" 40mm high volume fan.

I acquired a rather large steel hole punch, I chose this tool because it produces a much superior finish to a hole cutter and this project demanded a high level of finish (not to mention I loved having a valid excuse to own and use a huge allen key!)

If we had simply been modifying a single case I would have measured and marked up by hand. With the prospect of altering at least eight I laser cut a template from plywood which Andy Simpkins took great glee in excessively annotating.

We also used the opportunity to add bolt holes to securely attach the 2.5 inch SATA drives instead of using sticky pads.

Steve and I modified a single system to begin with both to check our alignment and the efficacy of the change. We were pleasantly surprised to discover that hoiby could now repeatedly do kernel compiles with all four cores flat out which was not possible before. The measured CPU temperature, which had previously been around 90°C, did not rise above 40°C

Steve and Andy on the assembly line
Steve, Andy and I then arranged a day where we took all the remaining units out of the rack at ARM, modified and returned them. We used the facilities at the Cambridge Makespace where I am a member to do the modifications.

I broke two 3mm drill bits and dulled a 4mm bit drilling all the holes, Roger Smith was good enough to loan us the use of his "Christmas tree bit" to ream the fan hole out to 16mm so we could thread the hole punch and cut the 60mm fan aperture out.

six modified systems ready to be re-racked.
We managed to get quite an assembly line going and, in my opinion, the results look pretty professional.

It has been several months since we did this work and these systems continue to run without issue. To complete the story we can see some graphs courtesy of the DSA munin instance.

CPU load on arnold.debian.org
You can clearly see the huge drop in temperature at the end of Week 25 despite the continuously high CPU load. Also there is only a single gap in the data after the changes (these indicate crashes where data was not recorded) where before there were frequent and extensive times where the systems were simply unusable.

CPU Temperature of arnold.debian.org
One reason I continue to enjoy Debian so much is the wide variety of ways in which I can contribute not only by maintaining my packages. Sometimes this kind of work does not receive the credit it deserves and hopefully highlights a small part of the frantic paddling that goes on under the serene surface of the Debian project to keep things "just working".

Wednesday, 24 September 2014

I wanted to go to Portland because it's a really good book town.

Plane at Heathrow terminal 5 taking me to America for Debconf 14Patti Smith is right, more than any other US city I have visited, Portland feels different. Although living in Cambridge, which sometimes feels like where books were invented, might give me a warped sense of a place.

Jo McIntyre getting on the tram at PDX
I have visited Portland a few times previously and I feel comfortable every time I arrive at PDX. Sure the place still suffers from the american obsession with the car but similar to New York you can rely on public transport to get about.

On this occasion my visit was for the Debian Conference which i was excited to attend having missed the previous one in Switzerland. This time the conference has changed its format to being 10 days long and mixing the developer time in with the more formal sessions.

The opening session gave Steve McIntyre and myself the opportunity to present a small token of our appreciation to Russ. The keynote speakers that afternoon were all very interesting both Stefano Zacchiroli and Gabriella Coleman giving food for thought on two very different subjects.

The sponsored accomodation rooms were plesent
Several conferences in the past have experienced issues with sponsored accommodation and food, I am very pleased to report that both were very good this time. The room I was in had a small kitchen area, en-suite bathroom, desks and most importantly comfortable beds.

Andy and Patty in the Ondine dining area
The food provision was in the form of a buffet in the Ondine facility. The menu was not greatly varied but catered to all requirements including vegetarian and gluten free diets.

Neil, Rob, Jo, Steve , Neil, Daniel and Andy dining under the planes
Some of us went on a visit to the Evergreen air and space museum to look at some rare aircraft and rockets. I can thoroughly recommend a visit if you are in the area.

These are just the highlights of the week though, the time in the hack-labs was productive with several practical achievements Including:
- Uploading new packages reducing the bug count
- Sorting out getting an updated key into the Debian keyring.

Overall I had a thoroughly enjoyable time and got a lot out of the conference this year. The new format suited me surprisingly well and as usual the social side was as valuable as the practical.

I hope the organisers have recovered enough to appreciate just how good a job they did and not get hung up on the small number of things that went wrong when the majority of things went perfectly to plan.

Monday, 15 September 2014

NetSurf 3.2

We recently released a new version of NetSurf this was largely to address numerous small bugs but did also include the persistent caching implementation I have written about previously. A release used to require the release manager (usually me) to perform a lot of manual processes and while we had a checklist it was far too easy to miss things.

The Continuous Integration (CI) system combined with signed release tags in git has resulted in a greatly simplified process indeed it has become almost completely automated. The majority of the manual work is now confined to doing the tasks that require actual decision making and checking we are releasing what was intended.

By having the CI system build release binaries the project now has a much clearer and importantly traceable process, I can recommend such a system to any project that produces releases especially if they release binaries for any of their targets.

I have also managed to package and upload this version of NetSurf ready for the Debian Jessie release. I would like to thank Jonathan Wiltshire for his assistance in ensuring this was a good quality package.

The release incorporates the successfully merged work of Rupinder Singh who was our our GSoc 2014 student. Rupinder mainly made improvements to our core DOM implementation and was very responsive and enthusiastic throughout his time despite the mentor team sometimes not being available.

This work goes towards improving NetSurf in the future by ensuring the underlying features are present in our core libraries. The GSoc mentors and all project developers are all pleased with the results of this years GSoc participation and would like to thank everyone involved in making our participation possible.

Along with the good news comes a little bad:
PowerPC Mac OS X
Despite repeated calls for assistance with new hardware and Java builds none has been forthcoming meaning that from this release we ware no longer able to ship PowerPC builds for MAC OS X.

The main issue is the last version of MAC OS X that runs on PPC is Leopard and there is no viable Java 1.6 port necessary for our CI system to run. Additionally the fully loaded PPC Mac mini (kindly donated to us by Mythic Beasts) had become far too slow to keep up with our builds and was causing long delays.
Bugs
NetSurf 3.2 Bug graph
We have a lot of bugs, in fact just during this release cycle we have 30 more bugs reported than we closed.So while the new bug reporting system has been a success and our users are reporting issues when they find them the development team is not keeping up..

The failure to keep up stems from the underlying issue of lack of manpower. We have relatively few active developers which is especially problematic when there are many users for a platform, such as RISCOS, but the maintainer is unable to commit enough time to fixing issues.

If you would like to help making NetSurf a better browser we are always happy to work with new contributors.

Sunday, 24 August 2014

Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind.

While I imagine Johannes Brahms was referring to music I think the sentiment applies to other endeavours just as well. The trap of believing an idea is worth something without an implementation occurs all too often, however this is not such an unhappy tale.

Lars original design idea
Lars Wirzenius, Steve McIntyre and myself were chatting a few weeks ago about several of the ongoing Debian discussions. As is often the case these discussions had devolved into somewhat unproductive noise and yet amongst all this was a voice of reason in Russ Allbery.

Lars decided that would take the opportunity of the upcoming opportunity of Debconf 14 to say thank you to Russ for his work. It was decided that a plaque would be a nice gift and I volunteered to do the physical manufacture. Lars came up with the idea of a DEBCON scale similar to the DEFCON scale and got some text together with an initial design idea.

CAD drawing of cut paths in clear acrylic
I took the initial design and as is often the case what is practically possible forced several changes. The prototype was a steep learning curve on using the Cambridge makespace laser cutter to create all the separate pieces.

The construction is pretty simple and consisted of three layers of transparent acrylic plastic. The base layer is a single piece of plastic with the correct outline. The next layer has the DEBCON title, the Debian swirl and level numbers. The top layer has the text engraved in its back surface giving the impression the text floats above the layer behind it.

Failed prototype DEBCON plaqueFor the prototype I attempted to glue the pieces together. This was a complete disaster and required discarding the entire piece and starting again with new materials.

The final version with stand ready to be presented
For the second version I used four small nylon bolts to hold the sandwich of layers together which worked very well.

Presentation of plaque photo by Aigars Mahinovs
Yesterday at the Debconf 14 opening Steve McIntyre presented it to Russ and I think he was pleased, certainly he was surprised (photo from Aigars Mahinovs).

The design files are available from my design git repo, though why anyone would want to reproduce it I have no idea ;-)

Wednesday, 16 July 2014

It is no great secret that my colleagues at Collabora have been doing work with the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

My desk is very near Marco and I often see him working with the various Pi boards. Recently he obtained one of the new B+ units for testing and I thought it looked a little sad sat naked on his desk.

To remedy this bare board problem I designed and built a laser cut a case for him and now the B+ has been publicly released I can make the design freely available.

The design is completely original though is inspired by several other plastic "clip" type designs I have seen. Originally I created and debugged the case design for my parallella though tweaking it for the Pi was pretty easy.

The design is under a CC attribution licence and I ought to say that my employer is in no way responsible for this, its all my own fault.